In an area which once used to be the Royal hunting grounds of the Saxon & Norman Kings, the name Dorton derives from an old English words dor, tun and means “farmstead or village at a narrow pass”. Situated on the outskirts of the village, work on the present Grade I Listed Jacobean Mansion began on the site of an earlier house in 1596 by Sir John Dormer and was completed in 1626.

In an area which once used to be the Royal hunting grounds of the Saxon & Norman Kings, the name Dorton derives from an old English words dor, tun and means “farmstead or village at a narrow pass”. Situated on the outskirts of the village, work on the present Grade I Listed Jacobean Mansion began on the site of an earlier house in 1596 by Sir John Dormer and was completed in 1626.

The architect of this beautiful Grade I List Jacobean property is still unknown, but the bricks used to construct the property were fired at the bottom of Brill Hill from locally sourced clay.  The present mansion is noted for its Tudor chimneys, mullions & portico’s, elaborate 17th Century plaster ceilings, imposing fireplaces and wooden panelling. The Saloon houses a very fine panelled screen with a carved frieze and strapwork crests. Alterations were carried out during the late 18th Century and the 20th Century.

In 1783 Sir John Fletcher bought the house and it remained in his family until 1928 when it was sold to Major Michael Beaumont.

In 1939 the Royal London Society for the Blind (RLSB) bought the house as a school which remained as such until 1955, when the RLSB moved the school to a purpose built property in Kent and took the name Dorton House with it.

It was at this time that James Harrison, Ashfold School’s first headmaster bought the house and surrounding estate and created an independent preparatory school, which remains the primary use of the venue today.